BDSM

The captivating world of BDSM

Time to read 2 min

The captivating world of BDSM

What does BDSM mean?

The abbreviation comes from the first letters of the English terms "bondage and discipline", "dominance and submission" and "sadism and masochism". It encompasses a variety of interrelated sexual practices that are often viewed as unconventional by society. BDSM games can be difficult to understand by outsiders due to their perceived intensity and are often subject to prejudice because they do not correspond to the traditional image of loving sexual behavior. In reality, BDSM goes far beyond the mere exercise of physical or psychological violence and the infliction of pain. On the contrary, this form of eroticism requires a deep connection and a high degree of mutual understanding between those involved.

Deviance is about people who consciously and voluntarily enter into a power imbalance from which everyone involved derives pleasure. Consent to such a game can only be given by someone who can adequately assess the consequences of their consent. We therefore recommend that anyone interested in BDSM do their research.

"B" for bondage

Bondage focuses primarily on various types of bondage practices that aim to more or less immobilize one's partner or oneself while providing sexual pleasure for both the tied person and the person being tied up. These practices include the use of ropes, handcuffs, leather cuffs or spreader bars, as well as the use of special bondage furniture such as a pillory or a St. Andrew's cross. Particularly widespread in the BDSM scene is the Japanese "Shibari", a special bondage style in which artistic and careful bondage is carried out using certain rope techniques and according to set rules.

"D" for Discipline

In the BDSM field, the term "discipline" is used to describe a tendency in which disciplining or punishing a partner is used to gain mutual pleasure. This includes both physical SM practices, such as the use of toys such as whips, canes or bare hands, as well as other forms of punishment, such as tunnel games or setting rules.

"S" and "M" for sadism and masochism

Also known by the catchy term "Sadomaso", the combination of sadism and masochism describes probably the most commonly perceived aspect of BDSM and is often equated with it. However, the term remains unclearly defined in both everyday language and clinical terminology.

Sadomasochism essentially refers to a sexual deviation in which a person experiences pleasure through the infliction or receipt of pain. Therefore, sadomasochism often involves the use of percussive instruments such as whips or canes. In contrast to mere discipline, in which pain serves as a means to an end, sadomasochism focuses on the erotic connection to pain.

It is important to emphasize that sadomasochism is clearly distinguished from non-consensual violence. People who identify as sadomasochists are psychologically healthy individuals who, contrary to prejudices, are not violent and who voluntarily live out their sexual inclinations.

What is there to consider in BDSM?

It is crucial that prior agreements are made between those involved to determine which practices are acceptable, which are not and, above all, for what purpose they should be carried out. It is therefore very important that you first become clear about your own needs and be able to communicate them clearly. The exact categorization within the BDSM spectrum is less important for the performance and experience.

Rather, the focus should be on a detailed discussion about the wishes of those involved, the planned sequence of activities and their limits. In such a conversation there is no place for shame or conforming to social norms. While safe sex should be a given, BDSM activities require additional safety precautions that those involved should also discuss in detail. Communication and safety are top priorities in BDSM.